What Happens to your Body When You Quit Smoking?

Quitting cigarettes is tough. What’s tougher, though, is not quitting. Lifelong smokers usually employ one of two tactics to justify their habit: 1) Denial Denying that cigarettes are harmful (or that you won’t be affected) is common. Some people just assume that if the effect of cigarettes does eventually catch up to them, they’ll be old and ready to die anyway. The problem with this train of thought is that everyone who regularly smokes cigarettes does long-term damage to their health, and there’s no guarantee that your life won’t be cut short by years of using cigarettes. 2) Resignation Arguably worse than denial is resigning to the fact that cigarettes are putting you on the fast track to death. There is no need for such a defeatist attitude, as everyone has it in themselves to quit, but finding the willpower can be extraordinarily hard for many smokers. Whatever the reason for your addiction, know that there are ways out. There are people willing to help you will yourself to quitting cigarettes. Rather than dwelling on the physical and emotional negatives of continuing smoking, let’s look at the positives. Quitting is Good for your Body After just half a day of giving up cigarettes, the percentage of carbon monoxide within your bloodstream returns to normal. This is a good start. In as little as two weeks after quitting, your lung function improves and your circulation becomes much more optimal. If you make it to the first month without smoking, you can look forward to reduced coughing and reduced discomfort, and your lungs will regain their ability to cope with mucus...

Science Catches up with Practice: How Hypnosis Works on the Brain

Hypnosis dates all the way back to the 18th century, when a charismatic healer called Franz Anton Mesmer – who believed in the link between the heavenly bodies and human health – set about curing illnesses with an array of fancy theatrics and magnets. But what we now know, with much more certainty, is that real science is at the heart of hypnosis, whether it was Mesmer and his interest in Paracelsian astrological principles, or modern day hypnotherapy on the Gold Coast. Hypnosis is real What has always been relatively clear, even over those hundreds of years, is that hypnosis is something. It’s real. People stop smoking, get over phobias, cope with extreme stress and trauma and deal with pain and a huge list of other things, all with the brain rather than medication. That much and more is crystal clear. But scientific arguments about what is really happening in the brain during hypnosis have always raged, because the mind is deeply mysterious and even the very latest 21st century science has been unable to properly explain it. Indeed, it’s still not clear exactly how hypnosis works on the brain in this strange, conscious-yet-trance-like, non-sleep state of relaxation, with heightened imagination and extreme concentration and suggestibility. Scientists have not even been able to agree if it really is a separate neuro-physiological state or whether the subject is kind of just ‘playing the game’. But that science is finally catching up with hypnosis A study conducted by Stanford University has found evidence that something fundamentally different really is happening in the brain beyond a subject’s mere expectations. MRI scanners found actual...

Smoking Causing Financial Stress

Why Smokers are Becoming More Stressed I have been helping smokers to quit for several years.  Although I personally am a non-smoker, I fully understand how smoking can become addictive and the power of nicotine. My brief experience of smoking goes back to my time spent in the Royal Marines.  I was in the commando division in the terrorists campaign in Cyprus.  This was way back in 1955 (this has really given away my age now!).  Our division had two smokers, the remainder non-smokers. On Christmas Day we were on duty and the CO brought us cigarettes and beers.  Persuaded by others, I had just one cigarette.  I didn’t enjoy it.  The following day was our Christmas Day.  After our dinner there was nothing else to do except go to the NAFFI, smoke and drink. Our camp was way up in the mountains with no way to leave. I started a smoke and before I was even half way through the cigarette, we were called out on duty.  I forget the reason –  probably an ambush or some other emergency.  I put the cigarette out and never picked up another.  It was not long before I was the only non-smoker in the section.  That is the history of my personal smoking experience. I think it ironical that my main clients are smokers.  Just think of the money and stress I have saved myself.  Although back in those days, being on active service, we could buy cigarettes for a shilling per packet.  I will not go into the conversion, I think a rough calculation would be a fraction of a dollar per packet....